Clothing & Hair

Clothing

Reference Art

A nineteenth-century artist's rendering of enslaved women's clothing used as inspiration for the look of Anna.

Female Clothing Styles, Paramaribo, Suriname, ca. 1831, as shown on slaveryimages.org, compiled by Jerome Handler and Michael Tuite and sponsored by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities.


Reference Art

A wood engraving depicting a scene from 1815 Washington, D.C., used as inspiration for the clothing worn in the film.

"A slave-coffle passing the Capitol. Washington D.C.," in A Popular History of the United States (New York: Scribner, Armstrong, and Company, 1876-1881), Retrieved from the Library of Congress.


Costume Detail

A dress created for the film by Nicole Rudolph, a graduate student in the Department of Textiles, Merchandising and Fashion Design at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.


Costume Detail

Detail of a dress created for the film by Nicole Rudolph.


Costume Detail

A petticoat created for the film by Nicole Rudolph.


Costume Detail

A child's coat created for the film by Nicole Rudolph.


Costume Detail

Pleating detail on a dress created for the film by Nicole Rudolph.


Costume Research

Nicole Rudolph discussing clothing fit with Michael Burton. Rudolph worked as a seamstress in Colonial Williamsburg for eight years. She specializes in 19th century costume for theater and film.


Costume Research

Nicole Rudolph advising how actresses in Nebraska and Virginia should wear hair wraps.


Costume Research

Nicole Rudolph shows Michael Burton a variety of reconstructed clothing from the early 1800s.


Hair

Reference Art

A painting of a scene observed by architect Benjamin Henry Latrobe through a tavern window in Norfolk, Virginia, was used as inspiration when determining the look of Anna. We made a conscious effort to be true to the time period and the personal importance enslaved people placed upon styling their hair.

Barbers, Norfolk, Virginia, 1797, as shown on slaveryimages.org, compiled by Jerome Handler and Michael Tuite and sponsored by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities.


Concept Art

A sketch of what Anna might look like.

Michael Burton, William G. Thomas, Kwakiutl Dreher, and Kalari Flotree worked through the concept and look of Anna, paying attention to the features of people from the Chesapeake region.

Sketch by Michael Burton.


Concept Art

A sketch with further revisions used to complete the style sheet of Anna, used to help identify the actress who would portray her.

Sketch by Michael Burton.


Screen Test

Actress Margarette Joyner in a screen test.


Final Costume and Hair, Live-Action

Actress Margarette Joyner in front of a green screen at Bridge Studios in Richmond, Virginia. Here, she is dressed in the garments made by Nicole Rudolph.


Final Costume and Hair, Rotoscope Animation

Anna fully rotoscope animated and set into the scene in the garret of the tavern on F Street.